Winter 2021 FYS:

Available topics for Winter FYS options are listed. To find out more about scheduled times and available sections, consult the Scheduler Tool or the Real-Time Course Schedule!

Fairy Tales: From the Brothers Grimm to Disney (CRN 20827)

In-person | Tuesdays & Thursdays 2:00pm-3:50pm | Instructor: Kristen Klay

Talking mirrors, glass slippers, and the Big Bad Wolf are all elements found in Grimms’ Fairy Tales. Collected in Germany in the early 1800s by Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm, these stories have enduring appeal and are a vital part of Western literary tradition. And yet, in the British-occupied sector of Germany following World War II, Grimms’ Fairy Tales were banned because they were deemed to be feeding “a bloodthirsty German imagination.” In this course we will analyze literary fairy tales from continental Europe and trace the history of the fairy tale from oral tradition to print and film. Although our focus will be on literary tales, we will also have an opportunity to look at fairy tale illustrations and to compare some of these stories to modern Disney film versions. In doing so, we will study some of the common motifs in fairy tales: family conflicts, socioeconomic class and power, infertility and pregnancy, gender roles, violence and punishment. We will also discuss and apply several different interpretive approaches to the tales.

_______________________________________________

Serial Killers (CRN 21463)

Online Asynchronous | Instructor: Miyuki Arimoto

This seminar examines different types of serial killers and explores possible reasons behind their killings. By exploring concrete cases, it defines different degrees of homicide and circumstances of homicide in the United States. The diversity in offenders’ demographic characteristics and motivations are also discussed.

_______________________________________________

Stories About Your Ancestors (CRN 21406)

Online Asynchronous | Instructor: Damian Koshnick

We all want to know where we came from and who came before us. This is why genealogy-based programs and services are more popular than ever. This course focuses on supporting your own process of research and discovery for finding the resources necessary to tell engaging and meaningful stories about your family and ancestors.

_______________________________________________

Sex, Gender, Genetics, and Culture (CRN 20801)

In-person | Mondays & Wednesdays 2:00pm-3:50pm | Instructors: Dana Schowalter & Kristin Latham-Scott

This seminar will examine biological sex development, and how ones sex intersects with how we see gender and communication in our culture. We will examine what beliefs we hold about sex and gender and why, what research is available to help us refine ideas, and investigate how to use new information about sex and gender in our daily lives.

_______________________________________________

Humans in Space: The Science, Politics and Ethics Behind Space Travel (CRN 20752)

In-person | Mondays & Wednesdays 2:00-3:50 | Instructor: Stephen Scheck

Human exploration of space is not quite as simple as Hollywood movies have portrayed over the years. This course will examine the biological, technological, political, economic and ethical issues associated with human engagement in space flight.

_______________________________________________

Money Management: Make Your Money Work for You (CRN 21157)

In-person | Tuesdays & Thursdays 12:00pm-1:50pm | Instructor: Bojan Ilievski

The goal of this class is to help students to become financially responsible, conscientious members of society. To reach that end, this course develops students’ understanding and skills in such areas as money management, budgeting, career planning, financial goal attainment, the wise use of credit, insurance, investments, and consumer rights and responsibilities.

This course will give students the tools and resources needed to make wise financial decisions. Students will analyze their personal financial decisions, evaluate the costs and benefits of their decisions, recognize their rights and responsibilities as consumers, and apply the knowledge learned to financial situations encountered later in life. Ultimately, they will learn how to put their money to work.

_______________________________________________

Protecting the Living World and its Inhabitants (CRN 20820)

In-person | Mondays & Wednesdays 2:00-3:50 | Instructor: Bryan Dutton

This course will explore the reasons for protecting biological diversity (aka “biodiversity”) along with particular places where biodiversity is found. The course will introduce important concepts through consideration of several ongoing conservation efforts while exploring the why and how behind these efforts.

_______________________________________________

#slayingpublichealth (CRN 21339)

Hybrid | In-person Thursdays 12:00pm-1:50pm | Instructor: Loren Wisniewski

This course showcases all the ways public health impacts living conditions and quality of life around the world, in Oregon, and on our campus. Through hands-on fieldwork, media, and guest lectures, students will explore ways to get involved locally and globally to make a positive difference in their communities.

_______________________________________________

Superheroes or Super Criminals? (CRN 21464)

Hybrid | In-person Wednesdays 8:00am-9:50am | Instructor: Jennifer Moreno

Superheroes are here to save the day and do whatever is necessary to defeat forces of evil. But what if “whatever’s necessary” crosses the line into criminal activity? In this course we examine epic good versus evil battles and analyze the criminal implications of being a superhero.

_______________________________________________

Exploring Natural Disasters: A Bad Day on Planet Earth

Online Asynchronous | Instructor: Philip Wade

This course focuses on natural disasters and how these normal processes of the Earth concentrate their energies and deal heavy blows to humans as well as have severe environmental and health impacts for many years after the event. This course is concerned with how the natural world operates and, in so doing, kills and maims humans and destroys their works. The course aims to explain important principles about the Earth and then develop further understanding through numerous case histories.

Sex, Gender, Genetics, and Culture (CRN 20801)

In-person | Mondays & Wednesdays 2:00pm-3:50pm | Instructors: Dana Schowalter & Kristin Latham-Scott

This seminar will examine biological sex development, and how ones sex intersects with how we see gender and communication in our culture. We will examine what beliefs we hold about sex and gender and why, what research is available to help us refine ideas, and investigate how to use new information about sex and gender in our daily lives.

_______________________________________________

Humans in Space: The Science, Politics and Ethics Behind Space Travel (CRN 20752)

In-person | Mondays & Wednesdays 2:00-3:50 | Instructor: Stephen Scheck

Human exploration of space is not quite as simple as Hollywood movies have portrayed over the years. This course will examine the biological, technological, political, economic and ethical issues associated with human engagement in space flight.

_______________________________________________

Protecting the Living World and its Inhabitants (CRN 20820)

In-person | Mondays & Wednesdays 2:00-3:50 | Instructor: Bryan Dutton

This course will explore the reasons for protecting biological diversity (aka “biodiversity”) along with particular places where biodiversity is found. The course will introduce important concepts through consideration of several ongoing conservation efforts while exploring the why and how behind these efforts.

_______________________________________________

Superheroes or Super Criminals? (CRN 21464)

Hybrid | In-person Wednesdays 8:00am-9:50am | Instructor: Jennifer Moreno

Superheroes are here to save the day and do whatever is necessary to defeat forces of evil. But what if “whatever’s necessary” crosses the line into criminal activity? In this course we examine epic good versus evil battles and analyze the criminal implications of being a superhero.

_______________________________________________

Exploring Natural Disasters: A Bad Day on Planet Earth

Online Asynchronous | Instructor: Philip Wade

This course focuses on natural disasters and how these normal processes of the Earth concentrate their energies and deal heavy blows to humans as well as have severe environmental and health impacts for many years after the event. This course is concerned with how the natural world operates and, in so doing, kills and maims humans and destroys their works. The course aims to explain important principles about the Earth and then develop further understanding through numerous case histories.

Fairy Tales: From the Brothers Grimm to Disney (CRN 20827)

In-person | Tuesdays & Thursdays 2:00pm-3:50pm | Instructor: Kristen Klay

Talking mirrors, glass slippers, and the Big Bad Wolf are all elements found in Grimms’ Fairy Tales. Collected in Germany in the early 1800s by Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm, these stories have enduring appeal and are a vital part of Western literary tradition. And yet, in the British-occupied sector of Germany following World War II, Grimms’ Fairy Tales were banned because they were deemed to be feeding “a bloodthirsty German imagination.” In this course we will analyze literary fairy tales from continental Europe and trace the history of the fairy tale from oral tradition to print and film. Although our focus will be on literary tales, we will also have an opportunity to look at fairy tale illustrations and to compare some of these stories to modern Disney film versions. In doing so, we will study some of the common motifs in fairy tales: family conflicts, socioeconomic class and power, infertility and pregnancy, gender roles, violence and punishment. We will also discuss and apply several different interpretive approaches to the tales.

_______________________________________________

Serial Killers (CRN 21463)

Online Asynchronous | Instructor: Miyuki Arimoto

This seminar examines different types of serial killers and explores possible reasons behind their killings. By exploring concrete cases, it defines different degrees of homicide and circumstances of homicide in the United States. The diversity in offenders’ demographic characteristics and motivations are also discussed.

_______________________________________________

Stories About Your Ancestors (CRN 21406)

Online Asynchronous | Instructor: Damian Koshnick

We all want to know where we came from and who came before us. This is why genealogy-based programs and services are more popular than ever. This course focuses on supporting your own process of research and discovery for finding the resources necessary to tell engaging and meaningful stories about your family and ancestors.

_______________________________________________

Sex, Gender, Genetics, and Culture (CRN 20801)

In-person | Mondays & Wednesdays 2:00pm-3:50pm | Instructors: Dana Schowalter & Kristin Latham-Scott

This seminar will examine biological sex development, and how ones sex intersects with how we see gender and communication in our culture. We will examine what beliefs we hold about sex and gender and why, what research is available to help us refine ideas, and investigate how to use new information about sex and gender in our daily lives.

_______________________________________________

Humans in Space: The Science, Politics and Ethics Behind Space Travel (CRN 20752)

In-person | Mondays & Wednesdays 2:00-3:50 | Instructor: Stephen Scheck

Human exploration of space is not quite as simple as Hollywood movies have portrayed over the years. This course will examine the biological, technological, political, economic and ethical issues associated with human engagement in space flight.

_______________________________________________

Protecting the Living World and its Inhabitants (CRN 20820)

In-person | Mondays & Wednesdays 2:00-3:50 | Instructor: Bryan Dutton

This course will explore the reasons for protecting biological diversity (aka “biodiversity”) along with particular places where biodiversity is found. The course will introduce important concepts through consideration of several ongoing conservation efforts while exploring the why and how behind these efforts.

_______________________________________________

#slayingpublichealth (CRN 21339)

Hybrid | In-person Thursdays 12:00pm-1:50pm | Instructor: Loren Wisniewski

This course showcases all the ways public health impacts living conditions and quality of life around the world, in Oregon, and on our campus. Through hands-on fieldwork, media, and guest lectures, students will explore ways to get involved locally and globally to make a positive difference in their communities.

_______________________________________________

Superheroes or Super Criminals? (CRN 21464)

Hybrid | In-person Wednesdays 8:00am-9:50am | Instructor: Jennifer Moreno

Superheroes are here to save the day and do whatever is necessary to defeat forces of evil. But what if “whatever’s necessary” crosses the line into criminal activity? In this course we examine epic good versus evil battles and analyze the criminal implications of being a superhero.

_______________________________________________

Exploring Natural Disasters: A Bad Day on Planet Earth

Online Asynchronous | Instructor: Philip Wade

This course focuses on natural disasters and how these normal processes of the Earth concentrate their energies and deal heavy blows to humans as well as have severe environmental and health impacts for many years after the event. This course is concerned with how the natural world operates and, in so doing, kills and maims humans and destroys their works. The course aims to explain important principles about the Earth and then develop further understanding through numerous case histories.

Fairy Tales: From the Brothers Grimm to Disney (CRN 20827)

In-person | Tuesdays & Thursdays 2:00pm-3:50pm | Instructor: Kristen Klay

Talking mirrors, glass slippers, and the Big Bad Wolf are all elements found in Grimms’ Fairy Tales. Collected in Germany in the early 1800s by Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm, these stories have enduring appeal and are a vital part of Western literary tradition. And yet, in the British-occupied sector of Germany following World War II, Grimms’ Fairy Tales were banned because they were deemed to be feeding “a bloodthirsty German imagination.” In this course we will analyze literary fairy tales from continental Europe and trace the history of the fairy tale from oral tradition to print and film. Although our focus will be on literary tales, we will also have an opportunity to look at fairy tale illustrations and to compare some of these stories to modern Disney film versions. In doing so, we will study some of the common motifs in fairy tales: family conflicts, socioeconomic class and power, infertility and pregnancy, gender roles, violence and punishment. We will also discuss and apply several different interpretive approaches to the tales.

 

 


General Education

CONTACT US

503-838-8296 | or e-mail: gened@wou.edu  | Location: Instructional Technology Center