Unbound: A First-Year Writing Anthology

Western Oregon University’s First-Year Writing Program publishes Unbound: A First-Year Writing Anthology, a digital collection of the exemplary work produced by students enrolled in WR 121 and WR 122 (College Writing 1 and College Writing 2). Unbound: A First-Year Writing Anthology celebrates the creative thinking, sophisticated prose, and impressive inquiry projects taken on by our students. The work in this anthology includes compositions in a range of genres and modalities, showcasing their identities as writers. 

To download a paper, click on the title. Student papers will download as fully accessible PDFs. If you identify an accessibility issue with a student paper, please contact Dr. Graziano using the contact information at the bottom of the page.

Volume 3

Photograph of Makenna Bergerson

Under the Microscope of Forensic Science

Winner of Outstanding Essay Award

Author: Makenna Bergerson

Course: WR 121

Instructor: Samantha Morgan

Abstract: An interview-based analysis of the writing, research, and genre conventions involved in forensics. The author considers how forensic scientists are used in the criminal justice community, some of the general protocols, as well as the specific fields one can pursue in forensics.

Keywords: STEM, forensic science, discourse community, genre analysis

Photograph of Laticia Garcia

Writing is Right the First Time

Winner of Outstanding Essay Award

Author: Laticia Garcia

Course: WR 121

Instructor: Samantha Morgan

Abstract: Reflects on the myth that writing is right the first time, when in reality it is important to make errors to improve one’s writing ability.

Keywords: Writing construct, error, drafting

Photograph of Addie Floyd

Grasping My Fragile Heart

Author: Addie Floyd

Course: WR 121

Instructor: Tandy Tillinghast

Abstract: A literacy narrative in which the author describes the transformative power of reading and writing in her life. In particular, she describes the emotional feelings she had while reading The Book Thief.

Keywords: Literacy narrative, reading, powerful authors, pathos

Photograph of Katie Chapman

Going The Distance: Cohesion’s Relationship to Discourse Communities

Winner of Best Essay Award

Author: Katie Chapman

Course: WR 122

Instructor: Dr. Leigh Graziano

Abstract: Original inquiry project examining the role of cohesiveness in the WOU cross country team. The author concludes by arguing that cohesion is a characteristic that should be added to Swale’s (1990) list of discourse community criteria.

Keywords: Discourse community, cohesion, primary research, cross-country

Photograph of Emmaline O'Donnell

Language in Vaccine Hesitancy and Anti-Vaccination Ideology

Winner of Best Essay Award

Author: Emmaline O’Donnell

Course: WR 122

Instructor: Tandy Tillinghast

Abstract: An original inquiry project, exploring the role of language in vaccine hesitancy and anti-vaccination beliefs through primary and secondary research. 

Keywords: STEM, language, discourse community, public health

 

Photograph of Malissa Brooks

Values and the Glorification of True Crime Fandoms

Author: Malissa Brooks

Course: WR 122

Instructor: Dr. Leigh Graziano

Abstract: True-crime walks the line between education and glorification, but how can a podcast assert specific values on its listenership? This essay analyzes the longest-running comedy true-crime podcast, Last Podcast on The Left. By examining the themes and strategies the hosts of LPOTL use, this essay shows how the hosts strategically imprint their values upon their listeners and the Reddit community page.

Keywords: Online discourse community, corpus textual analysis, true crime, ethos and value adherence

Photograph of Ashlynn Norton

Smart-Ass Women: The Rhetoric and Culture of an Online ADHD Support Group

Author: Ashlynn Norton

Course: WR 122

Instructor: Dr. Leigh Graziano

AbstractThis study focuses on a women-only ADHD online discourse community using observations to analyze their rhetoric and culture with the goal of bringing more attention to studying women-only online disability support groups and their importance to society.

Keywords: Online discourse community, textual analysis, observation, ADHD, disability support groups, safe spaces, rhetoric

Photograph of Guinievere Olander

Dancing with Inclusivity: The Importance of Integrating Genderless Terminology into Swing Dance Spaces

Author: Guinievere R. Olander

Course: WR 122

Instructor: Dr. Leigh Graziano

AbstractThis original inquiry project examines the nature of gender-inclusivity in swing dance spaces and reflects on whether or not gender neutral language, rather than gendered language, has an impact on the feelings of acceptance for dancers regardless of gender identity or conformity. This project uses primary research gathered from the WOU Swing Dance Club.

Keywords: Discourse community, primary research, gender, language, identity, inclusivity, noncomformity, swing dance

 

CONTACT US

Unbound: A First-Year Writing Anthology

Contact for publication Unbound: Dr. Leigh Graziano | 503-838-9360 | or e-mail: grazianol@wou.edu  | Location: MAASKE 311

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