Jay Schwartz

(He/him/his)

Assistant Professor, Psychological Sciences Department

| schwartzj@wou.edu
TODD 321

Personal Website

At WOU since

08/01/2020

Hobbies

Hiking, board games, coffee

Hometown

Bainbridge, WA

Office Hours

MonTuesWedsThursFri
 2:00-4:00 PM12:30-3:30 PM  
Please send me a message on Google Chat

Course schedule

Winter 2021
CRNCourseTitleTimesLocation
20122 PSY201 GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY MW 1000-1150 ONLINE CRS
20133 PSY360 COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY W 1600-1750 ONLINE CRS
20839 PSY468 ADVANCED RESEARCH METHODS T 1400-1550 ONLINE CRS

What you will do and learn in my courses

In my courses, in addition to learning cool and important information about psychological science, animal minds, evolution, and the biology of behavior, you'll develop critical and scientific thinking skills that will continue to be useful throughout college and beyond, regardless of your major. 

Education

2020 - PhD Psychology, Neuroscience and Animal Behavior Program, Emory University

2015 - MA Anthropology, The Ohio State University

2012 - BA Biology, Macalester College

Teaching focus

General Psychology, Motivation, Research Methods, Quantitative Methods, Cognitive Psychology

Research areas

I am interested in vocal communication, emotion, and evolution in humans and animals, and I investigate this by looking at both the production and perception of vocalizations. The production component involves observing and recording animals, to investigate the relationships between emotion and acoustic characteristics (such as pitch or duration) of their vocalizations. The perception component entails testing whether and how human participants perceive emotion from animal calls. The ultimate goal of this work is to gain insight into how emotions generally affect the evolutionary history and tragectory of vocal communication.

Given my interest in animals’ emotions, I am also passionate about animal welfare. Before obtaining my M.A. degree, I volunteered at a howler monkey sanctuary in Panama, and have published on best practices for primate rehabilitation.

Publications and Presentations

Peer Reviewed Publications

Schwartz JW, Engelberg JWM, Gouzoules H. 2020. Evolving views on cognition in animal communication: Contributions from scream research. Animal Behavior and Cognition. 7(2): 192-213. [link]

Schwartz JW, Engelberg JWM, Gouzoules H. 2020. Was that a scream? Listener agreement and major distinguishing acoustic features. Journal of Nonverbal Behavior. 44: 233-252. [link]

Schwartz JW, Gouzoules H. 2019. Decoding human screams: Perception of emotional arousal from pitch and duration. Behaviour. 156(13-14): 1283-1307. [link]

Engelberg JWM, Schwartz JW, Gouzoules H. 2019. Do human screams permit individual recognition? PeerJ. 7: e7807. [link] – Press: Science Daily

Schwartz JW, Hopkins ME, Hopkins SJ. 2016. Group pre-release training yields positive rehabilitation outcomes among juvenile mantled howler monkeys (Alouatta palliata). International Journal of Primatology. 37(2): 260-280. [link]




Did this faculty or staff member support your efforts to succeed? Give them a Student success shout-out.